Friday, April 17, 2015

How To Hack The Learning Process


Step 1: Read books.

For all that we mock the traditional publishing industry, any book that makes it through that process has gone through many quality filters.  If you further limit yourself to books that have withstood the test of time, reading books is the best way to inject concentrated, high-quality knowledge into your brain.

Step 2: Write up your notes each time you finish a book.

Consolidate your knowledge by writing your own summary afterwards.  1) This action "fixes" the knowledge in your brain.  2) You can always refer back to your summary afterwards to refresh your knowledge, and since you wrote it, it will be uniquely accessible to you.

You can find a lot of the books I've read here:
The Book Outlines Wiki

For example, I recently read a book on coaching, counseling, and mentoring to help me in my own executive coaching practice; taking notes will help me retain and apply what I learned:
Coaching Counseling and Mentoring
  

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Compassion is not a zero-sum game

I always remember one English seminar I took while I was at Stanford.  We were discussing Rebecca Harding Davis' travails, and one of my more militant classmates flatly stated, "Look, she was white, and she had money.  I don't want to hear about her problems."  (You probably won't be surprised to learn that my militant classmate was also a wealthy white woman).

I find this lack of compassion appalling.  The thinking seems to be that we need to compete on our miseries, and that ultimately, we must all defer to a starving genocide victim somewhere in Sub-Saharan Africa.  I don't believe that compassion is a zero-sum game.

Having problems, even first-world problems, is emotionally draining.  Having difficult choices, even if all the options are enviable, is still difficult.